What is a Vampire Facelift?

As you age, the collagen in your face depletes and wrinkles form from repetitive facial expressions. To keep a youthful look, there are many treatments that exist to correct the visible signs of aging but there are risks associated with these treatments of rejection as the body is very particular about what it will accept. One new treatment is the “vampire facelift” which uses autologous material from the patient, avoiding the chance of rejection.

Vampire facelift or the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment has been creating waves in the beauty industry. More so, after Kim Kardashian tried it in her much publicised reality TV show. The treatment though painful, holds the elixir to youthful-looking skin. We ask cosmetic dermatologist Dr Jaishree Sharad more about this treatment. 

What is the vampire facelift?

 

PRP or the vampire facelift is so called because your own blood is taken and after separation of different constituents, the plasma with the platelets is reinjected into the skin. PRP has a long history of being used in orthopaedic medicine, dentistry, and reconstructive surgery, and now its benefits are being applied to other fields of medicine such as dermatology and cosmetology as this plasma is rich in platelets (platelet-rich plasma or PRP) and it contains growth factors which stimulate skin regeneration.  

Platelets are an important component in our blood and are necessary for normal clotting. However, these very same platelets when activated, release several proteins as well as growth factors which release stem cells, increasing collagen formation, skin-tightening and overall rejuvenation. Due to all these benefits, it is also called ‘Facial Stem Cell Regeneration’ therapy. 


How is the vampire facelift done?

This cutting-edge rejuvenation treatment is a quick 20-30 minute procedure. A small amount of blood is drawn from the patient and placed in a sterile tube. Whilst the patient waits, it is spun down in a centrifuge at a pre-calculated speed for 5 to 10 minutes to separate the different components of the blood. 

Red and white blood cells are divided from the platelets and the plasma (the clear fluid). This plasma now contains a higher than normal number of precious platelets, nearly fivefold. The separated platelets are then activated with calcium chloride, to release more growth factors.

Local anaesthesia is given and the platelet-rich plasma is injected into the appropriate areas with very small needles similar to those used in Botox injections.

Who should get it done?

The treatment is ideal for individuals looking for gradual but noticeable improvement in skin texture, tone and colour with minimal downtime. The results give you a fresher and healthier appearance.

It can be used on all skin types and colours. It helps eliminating skin wrinkles, rejuvenating the skin, improves the appearance in those with acne scarring, and hastens the healing process after a facial peel. It also appeals to patients who are looking for a natural approach to volumise the face.

Common areas where it is used include sun-damaged and prematurely aged skin on cheeks and mid-face, jaw line, sagging skin on the neck, back of the hands and décolletage.

For best results, up to three treatments, 4-8 weeks apart, with top ups at around 12 months are recommended. Improvement in the skin texture is noticeable within the first month while full collagen regeneration takes 3 months. The improvements continue over the next 12 months, as new collagen production continues to improve the overall appearance of the dermis. The effects last for a variable period ranging from 18 months to 2 years.

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An App to Measure Attractiveness

As smartphones become more integrated into our lives, there are applications being made for absolutely everything imaginable. One of these apps is designed to measure the supposed attractiveness of an individual based on things like symmetry of facial features and angles in the face but is this app just another example of a negative influence on people today? Will it create just more self esteem issues? 

We know you don’t believe your mother when she tells you how beautiful you are. But would you believe a phone app?

And is that a good idea?

The Ugly Meter, an app that rates users’ attractiveness, shot up to the top of the list in the iPhone app store earlier this week, just behind Angry Birds.

While more than a dozen apps that operate on the same principle have been released in the last couple years – from “Fit or Fugly” to “FaceRate” – the Ugly Meter recently gained popularity because it was featured on Howard Stern’s Sirius radio show. The app has been a top seller in China for weeks. It costs 99 cents, but if you don’t want to pay for an ugliness app there’s also the Beauty Meter, which has been ranked highly by iTunes users, as well as Face Meter and Am I Ugly?

The Ugly Meter, whose tagline is “When your friends won’t tell you the truth, the Ugly Meter will,” works by scanning a user’s face and calculating the angles, symmetry, and proportions. It ranks user’s alleged ugliness on a scale of 1 to 10. Users who rank high on the scale earn disses from the program such as, “You could win a professional ugly contest.” Userswho rank low on the scale receive compliments such as, “You’re so sexy you make Athena jealous.”

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Acne Myths

Acne is a common skin condition that mostly affects adolescents and teens but is not exclusively limited to that age group. Many people have had acne so there are lots of information out there about it but it is imperative not to trust everything that you read. Here are eight common things that you’ve probably been told about acne that are completely false.

1. Acne is something that only happens to teenagers. Teens definitely do suffer from acne, but some people develop acne for the first time in their 20s or 30s. In fact, in Manhattan’s business districts, most patients treated for acne vulgaris are women between the ages of 20 and 45

2. Acne occurs because your face is dirty. Many people feel like acne means their face is somehow unclean — but that’s just not true. The truth is, acne is a complex skin disorder that can’t be boiled down to simply “dirt.” It’s likely that the connection between the skin condition and dirt was made because blackheads are, well, black — but blackheads aren’t caused by dirt, either.

3. To relieve acne, scrub your face really hard. Remember, acne isn’t caused by dirt — so you can’t just wash it away. A cleanser with ingredients like benzoyl peroxide, salicyclic acid and sulfur compounds will help clear the skin, but it won’t clear it any faster if you scrub harder. Scrubbing acne too hard can actually inflame blackheads, so be sure to be nice to your skin.

4. Popping your pimples makes everything better. Will you people please stop picking at your faces? Popping pimples spills inflammatory gunk into surrounding tissues, which can cause scarring. 

5. Acne will go away on its own, so it doesn’t need to be treated. Sorry, this condition can’t be ignored. Doing nothing can even cause the condition to get worse. Mild, topical treatments — such as over-the-counter benzoyl peroxide — are best, and they’re especially effective if started early.

Read more at: http://on.today.com/1U3B612